Political maps – Luxembourg Globe http://luxembourgglobe.com/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 05:15:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://luxembourgglobe.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-5.png Political maps – Luxembourg Globe http://luxembourgglobe.com/ 32 32 RISD Redistricting Maps Available for Public Viewing | Local News https://luxembourgglobe.com/risd-redistricting-maps-available-for-public-viewing-local-news/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 05:15:00 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/risd-redistricting-maps-available-for-public-viewing-local-news/ Three proposals to draw new boundaries for the Roswell Independent School District Board of Education are available for public comment, with the board to choose one at its October meeting. The three poster-size cards hang in the Board Room of the Administrative and Educational Services Complex, 300 N. Kentucky Ave. The public can view them […]]]>

Three proposals to draw new boundaries for the Roswell Independent School District Board of Education are available for public comment, with the board to choose one at its October meeting.

The three poster-size cards hang in the Board Room of the Administrative and Educational Services Complex, 300 N. Kentucky Ave. The public can view them between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m., Superintendent Brian Luck said.

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These two maps show where wind and solar jobs are in the United States https://luxembourgglobe.com/these-two-maps-show-where-wind-and-solar-jobs-are-in-the-united-states/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 03:46:49 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/these-two-maps-show-where-wind-and-solar-jobs-are-in-the-united-states/ An article highlights the number of jobs in a commuting zone that are wind or solar based on job opening data. Locations with higher shares of job openings that are wind-powered tended to be in the middle of the United States. With the Inflation Reduction Act enacted, there could be more green energy job vacancies. […]]]>
  • An article highlights the number of jobs in a commuting zone that are wind or solar based on job opening data.
  • Locations with higher shares of job openings that are wind-powered tended to be in the middle of the United States.
  • With the Inflation Reduction Act enacted, there could be more green energy job vacancies.

As the threat of climate change becomes more real every day, the United States is increasingly turning to green energy. And a recent study shows that some parts of the country are already experiencing a boom in wind and solar jobs based on job posting data.

It is according to a analysis using pre-pandemic job postings provided by Lightcast. The paper’s authors find, based on job posting data and what they consider wind and solar employment, that these jobs “are very unevenly distributed across the United States.”

Researchers found the share of 2019 job openings considered wind and solar in 741 commuting areas across the United States. Lightcast, formerly Emsi Burning Glass, provided the data used in the working paper, but the published results come from the authors’ interpretation of what counts as wind and solar jobs. Lightcast told Insider it has a broader definition of green jobs.

Insider mapped the article’s results by commuting zone and matched it to the county or counties to which the commuting zones are mapped. The following map shows the share of job openings that are wind turbines in commuting areas across the United States:

“Commuting areas with a high share of wind-powered employment are concentrated in a vertical strip down the middle of the country from Texas to North Dakota,” the authors wrote.

Outside this “vertical band” was the commuting area with the highest share. Condon, Oregon, 9.66% of job postings were for wind jobs. Vernon, Texas had the second highest share per newspaper at 4.76%.

The paper’s researchers note some limitations to the use of job posting data. For example, it is possible that these openings have not been filled.

The paper’s authors, E. Mark Curtis of Wake Forest University and Ioana Marinescu of the University of Pennsylvania, defined green jobs using three different criteria elements for their analysis. The jobs included had to correspond to at least one. For example, if the job title and/or occupation stated “solar”, “photovoltaic” or “wind”, then this was considered to fall within their definition. Another element is based on rated skills; it must “explicitly” need “a skill related to wind or solar energy”. Additionally, it falls under the definition “if posted by a company that has a relatively high share of jobs requiring wind or solar skills.”

While the wind map shows that shares tend to be higher in the middle of the county, the authors find that the share of solar jobs in an area does not follow exactly the same pattern as wind.

Childress, Texas had the highest share of solar job postings at 6.94%. Another location in Texas, Stephenville, followed behind that percentage. However, it was several percentage points behind, with a 2.35% share.

While some of these percentages seen in the different commuting zones for these two green jobs across the country may seem small, Curtis told Insider they can still have a big impact.

“If you’re talking about 1% of direct wind and solar jobs, especially in some of these communities, that’s a really big deal,” Curtis said.

One state that stood out in the document is Texas, as the document notes it “has a high share of wind and solar jobs.”

“Thus, Texas is already an energy hub for fossil fuels and renewables,” the authors wrote.

With the enactment of the Inflation Reduction Act, more jobs in the clean energy sector are expected to be created

The Inflation Reduction Act is expected to create new jobs in clean energy. Researchers from the Political Economy Research Institute find that it will create more than 900,000 jobs per year on average over 10 years. A White House Fact Sheet also argues that it will create clean energy jobs. The Inflation Reduction Act is also supposed to help reduce emissions and reduce people’s energy costs.

Curtis said based on his findings and those of his co-author that the types of green energy jobs “likely to be created by the [Inflation Reduction Act] will be well paid and located in regions whose economies depend on the extraction of fossil fuels. » To research already suggests that there could be millions of jobs created over 10 years as a result of the Inflation Reduction Act.

Curtis told Insider that a key finding based on the job posting data he and his co-author used is “that the jobs that are being created are largely in areas that currently have high employment. in fossil fuels. He added that this suggests “it will make the transition from a fossil fuel-based energy economy to a renewable energy-based economy smoother than it otherwise would have been.” However, he added ‘we don’t have any direct evidence on this’.

“Given the domestic production requirements that are part of the bill, we should expect to see more solar and wind jobs appear in manufacturing than was seen in the study,” Curtis said. “One of the main reasons why environmental legislation has been so difficult to pass is that it has lacked political support from rural and ‘red’ areas of the country.”

Curtis pointed out that many of the green job openings are in “red” areas of the United States, such as parts of Texas.

“The paper’s findings suggest that jobs created in green energy will largely go to more conservative areas that have historically relied on fossil fuels,” Curtis said. “Future environmental legislation is more likely to be passed if the green energy transition is seen as helping these regions.”

The study not only looked at where wind and solar jobs are in the United States, but also included wind and solar jobs by occupation and industry, wage premiums, education needed, and growth in job vacancies over time. time. Curtis told Insider that one of the takeaways from his and his co-author’s research is just how big the growth in these green energy jobs has been since 2007. They found that the offers for wind and solar jobs had “more than tripled since 2010”.

And more clean or green energy jobs could be created through the Cut Inflation Act.

“Clean energy tax credits will be increased by 10% if clean energy projects are established in communities that previously relied on the extraction, processing, transportation or storage of coal, oil or gas as an important source of employment, creating jobs and economic development in the communities that have powered America for generations,” said fact sheet from the White House about the Inflation Reduction Act said.

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FCC challenge process important for getting accurate maps, says Technology Policy Institute: Broadband Breakfast https://luxembourgglobe.com/fcc-challenge-process-important-for-getting-accurate-maps-says-technology-policy-institute-broadband-breakfast/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 21:12:41 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/fcc-challenge-process-important-for-getting-accurate-maps-says-technology-policy-institute-broadband-breakfast/ WASHINGTON, June 30, 2022 — The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday officially launched its new system for collecting broadband service information from more than 2,500 broadband providers. The collection of broadband data “marks the beginning of [the FCC’s] window to collect location-by-location data from vendors that we will use to create the map,” the FCC […]]]>

WASHINGTON, June 30, 2022 — The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday officially launched its new system for collecting broadband service information from more than 2,500 broadband providers.

The collection of broadband data “marks the beginning of [the FCC’s] window to collect location-by-location data from vendors that we will use to create the map,” the FCC Chairman said. Jessica Rosenworcel in a Press release.

Screenshot of Bill Price, Vice President of Government Solutions for LightBox

Broadband providers will be required to provide availability statements and supporting data. Supporting data will include sections such as “Spread Modeling Information” and “Link Budget Information”. The deadline for submission is September 1.

Rosenworcel said the agency has established consistent parameters that require broadband providers to submit data using geocoded locations that “will enable [the FCC] to create a very accurate picture of fixed broadband deployment, unlike previous data collections, which focused on census blocks, giving us inaccurate and incomplete maps.

With this information, the FCC will create a common data set of locations in the United States where fixed broadband service can be installed, called the “fabric”. Rosenworcel said this fabric will serve as the “baseline against which all fixed broadband availability data will be reported and overlaid in our new broadband availability maps”.

Once the maps are complete, government entities and ISPs will be assigned a dispute window during which availability requests can be disputed based on the data submitted.

Rosenworcel previously said the enhanced broadband cards would be available by the fall.

States expect to be busy verifying these claims as they come out, panelists at the Broadband Breakfast Live online event said Wednesday. States will be involved in individual dispute processes and will be required to provide availability information through individual speed tests.

States want these maps to be correct because they serve as a decision-making tool when it comes to broadband investment, said Price charged, vice president of government solutions for LightBox, a data platform that helps states create broadband maps. This means that many states have committed to obtaining accurate local coverage data to use federal and state funding.

Our Broadband Breakfast Live Online events take place on Wednesdays at noon ET. Watch the event on Broadband Breakfast, or SIGN UP HERE to join the conversation.

Wednesday, June 29, 2022, 12 p.m. ET – Broadband mapping and data

Now that the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s Funding Opportunity Notice has been released, attention turns to a critical activity that must take place before broadband infrastructure funds are released. be distributed: updated broadband maps from the Federal Communications Commission. Under the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, as implemented by the NTIA’s Broadband Equity, Access and Deployment program, these FCC address-level maps will determine the allocation of funds. between states and will serve as a key source of truth. Our panelists will also examine the role of maps at the state level, the NTIA challenge process, and other topics. Join Broadband Breakfast as we revisit one of our most familiar topics: broadband data and mapping.

Speakers:

  • Price chargedVice President, Government Solutions, LightBox
  • Dustin WolfProgram Manager, Marconi Society National Broadband Mapping Coalition
  • Ryan GuthrieVice President of Solutions Engineering at ATS
  • Drew Clark (moderator), editor and publisher, Broadband Breakfast

Panelist Resources:

Price charged, vice president of government solutions, is responsible for LightBox broadband data and mapping solutions for government. Bill has over 40 years of experience developing and operating telecommunications and technology services. Its track record includes delivery of the Georgia state location-level broadband card, the first fiber metro area network in the United States, and the launch of Internet service from BellSouth. LightBox combines proven and cutting-edge GIS and Big Data technologies to transform the way decisions are made when planning and investing in broadband infrastructure.

Dustin Wolf is an Internet governance and policy expert and program manager for the Marconi Society’s National Broadband Mapping Coalition. Much of his work focuses on improving digital inclusion and establishing transparent, open source, and openly verifiable mapping methodologies and standards.

Ryan Guthrie is Vice President of Solutions Engineering at Advanced Technologies & Services. He started at ATS in 2006 and has been involved in all aspects of the business, from sales and marketing to solution design and implementation. Ryan also manages regulatory solutions for ATS and has been deeply involved in federally funded broadband projects assisting ISPs with their performance metrics testing compliance.

Drew Clark is the editor and publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and a nationally respected telecommunications attorney. Drew brings together experts and practitioners to advance the benefits offered by broadband. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, he spearheaded a State Broadband Initiative, the Partnership for a Connected Illinois. He is also president of the Congress of Rural Telecommunications.

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IDF maps homes of 2 gunmen who killed officer https://luxembourgglobe.com/idf-maps-homes-of-2-gunmen-who-killed-officer/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 06:15:00 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/idf-maps-homes-of-2-gunmen-who-killed-officer/ Israeli forces operated overnight from Wednesday to Thursday in the village of Kfar Dan, near Jenin, to map the homes of the two Palestinian gunmen who killed an Israeli officer the day before. The two terrorists were killed in the attack along the West Bank security fence that claimed the life of Major Bar Falah, […]]]>

Israeli forces operated overnight from Wednesday to Thursday in the village of Kfar Dan, near Jenin, to map the homes of the two Palestinian gunmen who killed an Israeli officer the day before.

The two terrorists were killed in the attack along the West Bank security fence that claimed the life of Major Bar Falah, deputy patrol commander of the Nahal Brigade.

Video poster

The houses were mapped before possible demolition, in line with Israel’s policy of deterring terrorist attacks.

During the operations, Palestinian rioters opened fire and threw explosive devices, prompting an Israeli military response. The Palestinian Health Ministry said a 17-year-old Palestinian, Oday Salah, was killed by Israeli fire during the clashes.

Jenin Governor Akram Rajoub blamed Israel for the deteriorating situation in the northern West Bank cities of Jenin and Nablus in an interview with Return the bet.

He pointed the finger at the “extreme right” government in Israel, which he said “does not want the situation to calm down”.

“Nobody encourages what is happening on the ground,” he said, lamenting the political impasse in which the Palestinian Authority finds itself.

Falah, 30, from Netanya, was buried Wednesday night at the Netanya Military Cemetery, north of Tel Aviv.

“We will not hesitate to act where the Palestinian Authority does not maintain order,” Israeli Prime Minister Yair Lapid said on Wednesday after the attack claimed by the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, the armed wing of the Fatah party of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

Since a series of anti-Israeli attacks from March that left 19 dead, the Israeli army has increased its operations in the northern West Bank, particularly in the regions of Nablus and Jenin where Palestinian armed terrorist groups operate. .

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Common Council Approves Maps Proposed by Syracuse City Redistricting Commission https://luxembourgglobe.com/common-council-approves-maps-proposed-by-syracuse-city-redistricting-commission/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 03:50:00 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/common-council-approves-maps-proposed-by-syracuse-city-redistricting-commission/ Get the latest news from Syracuse delivered straight to your inbox. Subscribe to our newsletter here. The Municipal Council of Syracuse past the redistricting map proposed by the City of Syracuse Redistricting Commission in a 5-4 vote Monday. The new quarters will come into effect next year. District councilors at large who represent the city […]]]>

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The Municipal Council of Syracuse past the redistricting map proposed by the City of Syracuse Redistricting Commission in a 5-4 vote Monday. The new quarters will come into effect next year.

District councilors at large who represent the city as a whole — Rasheada Caldwell, Michael Greene, Amir Gethers and Rita Paniagua — collectively voted yes. District Councilors Latoya Allen, Patrick Hogan, Jennifer Schultz and Chol Majok all voted no. Jimmy Monto, who was recently swornwas the only district councilor to vote yes.

The redistricting commission, which is made up of fifteen independent volunteer citizens, began working on the redistricting process in March this year. Group commissioner Jason Belge said the division of the common council between district councilors and general councilors in the vote reflected political differences.

“We really wanted to keep it bipartisan, but, of course, with politics you tend to see self-interest trump public interest,” Belge said.



Belge and the commission held 12 community meetings between March and July to gather public feedback on the maps throughout the process. The commission also aimed to keep neighborhoods and communities together in the new map, Belge said.

Hogan said the commission should have included nine districts instead of five to better represent the large number of distinct communities in Syracuse. He also felt that the redistricting process itself was unnecessary.

“(The) redistricting is probably one of the most insignificant things I voted for, basically it doesn’t really change much,” Hogan said in an interview with The Daily Orange. “It really didn’t do much for the average voter in town, it really doesn’t change their lives one iota.”

Belge said each of the five new districts had about 29,900 people. In the new map, the University Hill neighborhood of Syracuse University will be in District 3, along with the neighborhoods of University District, SU South Campus, Outer Comstock, Meadowbrook, and Westcott. Previously, the SU zone was in District 4.

The boundary between Districts 3 and 4, which separates the SU area from the Southside neighborhood, is aligned with the I-81 freeway. Belge said the commission was using the highway as a “natural barrier” to divide the two.

District 4 is a majority-minority constituency with a majority of black voters. The total black population of voting age in District 4 is about 54%, Belge said.

“When we went to break it down to make sure these districts were proportional, this Southside district … almost created itself,” he added.

Schultz expressed concern about the majority-minority district during the council meeting. She cited repeated voter concerns about the district and suggested boundary changes in the Fifth District.

“I feel like (the majority-minority district is) an unresolved issue that really needs more attention,” Schultz said at the meeting.

District 1, which is on the north side of Syracuse, will include the Northside, Washington Square and Near Northeast neighborhoods. On the west side, near Onondaga Lake and the Destiny Mall, District 2 will encompass Downtown, Lakefront, Tipperary Hill, Skunk City, Strathmore, Elmwood and all Westside neighborhoods. The northeast area is designated as District 5 and includes Sedgwick, Lincoln Park, Salt Springs, Eastwood and Near Eastside.

The commission used census data to draw the district to keep communities with similar demographics together and therefore amplify their voices through the vote, Belge said.

Allen expressed concern that the district lines were not accurate for the actual communities and said the vote should have been in the hands of the people of Syracuse, not the Common Council.

“We’re not going to go out of our way and have odd ball shaped neighborhoods, but contiguous shapes and sizes created with natural boundaries,” Belge said. “If there’s a predominantly black neighborhood, say on the south side, we thought it was important not to break that up.”

Contact Stephanie: spwright@syr.edu

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The state court had the right to void legislative maps; Traffic disturbances on Mountain Road; Share the road https://luxembourgglobe.com/the-state-court-had-the-right-to-void-legislative-maps-traffic-disturbances-on-mountain-road-share-the-road/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 09:03:54 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/the-state-court-had-the-right-to-void-legislative-maps-traffic-disturbances-on-mountain-road-share-the-road/ The 4-3 majority decision of the Maryland Court of Appeals written by Senior Judge Robert N. McDonald in the recent General Assembly redistricting case demands an answer. Justice McDonald said the court would be going too far if it sought to replace the General Assembly’s legislative district map with its own redistricting plan. He said […]]]>

The 4-3 majority decision of the Maryland Court of Appeals written by Senior Judge Robert N. McDonald in the recent General Assembly redistricting case demands an answer.

Justice McDonald said the court would be going too far if it sought to replace the General Assembly’s legislative district map with its own redistricting plan. He said “drawing up a redistricting map is not a basic judicial power, so the court may substitute its preferred district boundaries for those the legislature has adopted.” This reasoning is fallacious because it clearly contradicts the Court of Appeals redistricting decision 20 years ago that replaced the court’s own plan with the blatantly political plan drafted by Gov. Parris N. Glendening. As one of the plaintiffs in the bipartisan lawsuit that overturned the Glendening plan, I know the court has had ample precedent this year for throwing out the legislature’s gerrymandered redistricting plan and drawing a new map.

The court recognized in 2002 that Glendening’s plan violated state constitutional provisions calling for legislative districts to be compact and respect geographic boundaries and county/city subdivision boundaries. In 2022, the court intentionally ignored these violations.

Three years ago, in Rucho v. Common Cause, the United States Supreme Court specifically cited state courts as the proper venue to provide judicial remedy for partisan gerrymandering.

John R. Leopold, Stoney Beach

Leopold is a former Anne Arundel County Executive and State Delegate

The Anne Arundel County Traffic Division and Anne Arundel County East District First Responders must create a plan that all responders can rely on to manage traffic in the event the Mountain Road Peninsula is closed in case of emergency. Also, there needs to be an official way to let the public know what’s going on (besides unreliable Facebook gossip), open and closed roads, and give the “best guess” of when the road might close. ‘open.

On September 2, Mountain Road had to be closed around 2 p.m., between its intersection with the east end of Route 100 and Woods Road. This left Woods Road, a narrow, winding road with no shoulder as the only way in and out of a peninsula that is home to around 30,000 people, a high school, middle school and two elementary schools, plus a number of ‘businesses that attract companies from the metropolis. Woods Road was swamped with traffic, leaving feeder roads (Route 100, Mountain Road, Magothy Beach, Magothy Bridge, etc.) a chaotic parking lot of confused, angry drivers on a pre-holiday Friday afternoon. If the emergency had happened further east, there would have been absolutely no access and things would have been even worse.

There is no doubt that the road closure for a gas leak was unavoidable to protect lives and property. The utility workers deserve our thanks and admiration for repairing the damage quickly so that the road could be reopened approximately four hours later. In addition, school staff, who also could not leave work, found themselves with students who could not leave school because buses and parents could not arrive to pick up students. They not only supervised the students, but found a way to feed them. Thanks!

However, the police, who each did their best to manage the traffic, often worked against the flow, sending people to blocked places and forcing cars to turn around, only to be redirected, to turn around again . and sometimes redirected and returned yet again. After being redirected and turned around multiple times and receiving conflicting instructions from multiple officers at the same intersection just 20 feet apart, people were understandably confused and angry.

Maybe this situation will not happen again; I hope not. But it’s in everyone’s interest that the county’s traffic, police and fire departments develop a contingency plan for how to handle traffic in east Pasadena if Mountain Road is to be reopened. closed. Additionally, they must let the public know and include an official website where the public can go to see which roads are open and closed, and provide an expectation as to when Mountain Road might reopen. If I need to find a hotel for the night, let me know! They could also post signs at key intersections with the website URL to search for information in case of blocking.

There is no perfect solution to the unexpected closures of a dead end road that is affecting the lives of tens of thousands of people. But with foresight, I’m sure we can do better than what we did on September 2. It is in everyone’s interest to have a traffic management plan and that the public can easily access it.

Anita Heygster, Pasadena

Last Friday, a cycling friend of mine was apparently hit by a car while riding. She was almost home when it happened. Details are not yet known, as she does not remember the accident, but she suffered multiple serious fractures and is lucky to be alive. I thank God that she survives. It has become increasingly dangerous to cycle on our county roads and too many of these hazards are man-made.

Cyclists skim the shoulders for slippery gravel and sharp rock; The sticks; low branches; broken glass; potholes; kill on the road; garbage and trash flying out of cars and truck beds. Manhole and utility covers are sticking or missing. Wet leaves and painted lines can cause you to skid. Vehicles pull out of driveways and cross stop signs on our way. Cyclists ride in the safety of a group for good reason.

We face additional dangers created by those few drivers who find it amusing to harass cyclists. The vans discharge us of their exhaust fumes. Some throw objects, honk their horns or shout profanities. Distracted drivers regularly approach so close that we could reach out and touch them as they pass. Even quiet back roads are busy with high-speed vehicles that often use both lanes. Our weekend rides can be near-death experiences.

Cyclists ride on the shoulder with all these physical dangers unless there is no shoulder to take. Most drivers are accommodating, but it only takes one. We’re not riding to slow you down, but maybe you should slow down anyway. Honking and insulting us at 8 a.m. on a Saturday morning? Relax and share the road. Please ride safe everyone!

Virginia Olson, Arnold

Olson is a member of the Annapolis Triathlon Club

I have read K. McMahon’s letter to the editor, and I also feel the pain of the lack of responsiveness of government employees. This year, I called the county offices several times to be told that the employees were working from home and would call me back when they got back to the office. I left messages on answering machines and never received a return call.

Anne Arundel County closed for COVID in March 2020, so the county executive had over two years to resolve issues with phone service, equipment, employee scheduling, and customer service. He is now in a pickle. He can potentially lose county employee votes by forcing them back into office or he can continue to allow county employees to work from home and lose taxpayer votes.

The county executive was elected (hired) to make executive decisions and to keep the county open. Are the past two years a review of what to expect in another term? Just food for thought.

Helene C. Raven, Annapolis

K. McMahon’s letter lamented the county’s failure to honor a Homestead credit in 2021 for a home purchased the same year. But the first condition for benefiting from the credit is that the ownership of the property cannot have changed during the previous tax year. In other words, one can claim this credit at any time, but the credit is not effective until the property’s second tax year, or in this case, 2022.

In my opinion, it is unfortunate that the McMahon letter was published, or at least published without an editorial explanation of the matter. I believe the person selecting the letters for publication should have pointed out the problem, educated the author, and then asked if the author still wanted the letter published.

J. Manheim, Edgewater

Yesterday I attended our grandson’s baseball game at Gambrills. I had the pleasure of sitting down with my family as well as Andrew Pruski’s family. Andrew and his wife are truly a family of educators. Andrew’s wife has certainly proven herself to be a hardworking teacher and assistant principal at Chesapeake Middle School and now Old Mill Middle South. Andrew worked very hard serving his district on the county council. In fact, I spoke at a council meeting in February of this year about a bill regarding safe schools. I’m retired now, but I taught public schools in our county for 31 years. At this meeting, I was impressed by Andrew Pruski. He spoke very wisely about school safety and protecting our first responders. Andrew is truly a real asset to the district he serves. If you reside in District 33A, please consider Andrew Pruski when voting.

Carolyn Smith, Severna Park

The primary election took place in July, but signs of unelected and elected candidates continue to litter our roads. I believe county and city codes require the removal of campaign signs several days after the election. I understand the logic that candidates running in the general election may want to keep their signs, but to those who lost and are not running in the general election, please remove those signs.

Peter Sheil, Annapolis

Am I the only one tired of hearing the moans of those who are perpetually wronged? I read every day about some group or another asking for special treatment, accommodation or acknowledgment for perceived mistreatment – ​​real or imagined – and nothing ever seems to satisfy them. Maybe the problem is not with others. How about sucking it, putting on your big boy pants and living on. Learn how to deal with the obstacles, limits or obstacles that life has thrown at you and show how resilient you can be. Because otherwise, you just look like angry babies.

Peter Tutini, Annapolis

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Judge’s decision card strategy for concealed gun holsters in New York https://luxembourgglobe.com/judges-decision-card-strategy-for-concealed-gun-holsters-in-new-york/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 11:24:35 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/judges-decision-card-strategy-for-concealed-gun-holsters-in-new-york/ A federal judge has written what could become a plan to challenge New York’s concealed carry law. New York and other states, including California, rushed to pass legislation after the US Supreme Court overturned a century-old law that limit who could carry a handgun in public. New York has banned concealed weapons in most public […]]]>

A federal judge has written what could become a plan to challenge New York’s concealed carry law.

New York and other states, including California, rushed to pass legislation after the US Supreme Court overturned a century-old law that limit who could carry a handgun in public.

New York has banned concealed weapons in most public places. Private business owners may choose to allow concealed weapons in their establishments under the law and must post signs stating this.

Although U.S. District Judge Glenn T. Suddaby refused a request last week to prevent the entry into force of the law, its 78 pages decision describes at length why the law could be declared unconstitutional.

Among his reasons:

  • The new law omitted the phrase “other than in self-defense”, which could create a Second Amendment problem;
  • The list of “sensitive places” drawn up by the State is long and the fact of automatically declaring a private property a restricted place usurps the rights of private property;
  • The law’s requirements for social media and character references give licensing officers too much discretion and risk being punished for political speech in violation of the First Amendment;
  • Fifth Amendment concerns stem from the fact that an applicant must incriminate themselves by providing all of the information required for the permit.

Lawyers involved in other cases are sure to notice Suddaby’s assertion that plaintiffs had a “high probability of success” on many of their claims, noted Margaret Finerty, co-chair of the shootings task force. Mass of the New York State Bar Association.

“I think they’ll learn from the judge’s decision,” said Finerty, a partner at Getnick and Getnick LLP and a member of the American Bar Association’s standing committee on gun violence.

“The judge basically said we were right,” said William Robinson, director of communications for Gun Owners of America New York.

The state’s Republican Party said it plans to consider the judge’s decision as it prepares a lawsuit to be filed jointly with the Conservative Party.

“As the judge said, Kathy Hochul’s law is patently unconstitutional and we are confident that it will ultimately be struck down,” GOP Chairman Nick Langworthy said in an emailed statement. “We work with the best legal experts to ensure that, once filed, our case progresses successfully.”

Concealed carry permits

New York law has increased the requirements for obtaining a concealed carry permit, such as requiring a list of current and former social media accounts for the past three years, seeking four character references that can attest to the good character of the applicant and requiring 16 hours of in-person training and two hours of live-fire training.

The law followed two shootings on New York City subway trains that injured dozens of people and left one dead. A racist gunman also killed 10 black people in a mass shooting at a supermarket in Buffalo, NY on May 14.

“Responsible gun control action saves lives, and any attempt by the gun lobby to bring down New York’s sensible gun control laws will be met with a fierce defense of the law,” said State Attorney General Letitia James (D). “We will continue to defend the constitutionality of our laws to protect all New Yorkers.”

Case dismissed

Gun Owners of America, its New York branch, and Ivan Antonyuk, a member of the Gun Owners Group, filed a lawsuit on July 11, alleging that the new concealed carry law is unconstitutional. He took issue with several aspects of the legislation, including the long list of sensitive locations and “the incredulous requests by applicants for the transport license”.

The judge dismissed the case, largely because Antonyuk did not specify that he intended to carry a concealed weapon after the law took effect, only that he would like to.

Intent to carry and evidence of an imminent threat of arrest or prosecution by law enforcement would have been required to seek an injunction, Suddaby wrote.

Suddaby also took issue with part of the law which states that no license will be issued or renewed unless the person is a “good character” applicant with the necessary judgment to use the weapon only in a manner who does not put himself or himself in danger. others. The legislation didn’t include the phrase “other than in self-defense,” and without it, New York residents are left with a statue “beset with a deep Second Amendment problem,” he said. he declares.

The plaintiff would have had a “high probability of success” in challenging that omission and also could have prevailed over its overtraining claims, he said.

“We will be back in court,” Robinson said. “The US Constitution is on our side, so we’re going to win this.”

Ongoing cases

On July 11, Buffalo real estate developer Carl Paladino filed a lawsuit, claiming that the provision automatically prohibiting private businesses from concealing weapons violates the US Constitution.

A concealed carry permit applicant also complaint lodged claiming that social media, personality reference and training requirements of the law violate the right to free speech, to bear arms and to due process.

The New York State Jewish Gun Club also said it plans to file a lawsuit, challenging the ban on guns in places of worship.

It’s understandable that the state wants tougher gun laws, more training and social media scrutiny, Finerty said, noting that the Buffalo shooter posted his plans online and then broadcast the shot. attack live.

“I think the state has a lot of good points it can make to support the law,” Finerty said. “A lot of people think it’s just too broad, and it will be very interesting to see how that plays out in court.”

Everytown for Gun Safety advocates universal background checks and other gun control measures. Michael Bloomberg is the majority owner of parent company Bloomberg Government and is a member of the Everytown Advisory Board.

The cases are Anthonyuk et al. c. BrünNDNY, Case 1:22-cv-00734-GTS-CFH, Decision 8/31/22; Paladin c. New York State Police Superintendent Et al., WDNY, Case 1:22-cv-00541, Complaint 7/11/22; and Jonathan Corbett vs. Kathleen HochulSDNY, Case 1:22-cv-05867, Complaint 7/11/22.

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Miranda wins the Democratic primary for the state Senate seat; newly drawn voting cards tested https://luxembourgglobe.com/miranda-wins-the-democratic-primary-for-the-state-senate-seat-newly-drawn-voting-cards-tested/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 07:41:15 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/miranda-wins-the-democratic-primary-for-the-state-senate-seat-newly-drawn-voting-cards-tested/ Community Organizer Samantha Montaño won a Four-way Democratic primary race to take the seat in the House of Elugardo, and Christopher J. Worrell, who has held various positions in local government, prevailed in a three-way Democratic primary contest to succeed Miranda, according to the AP . Only a small fraction of the state’s 200 legislative […]]]>

Community Organizer Samantha Montaño won a Four-way Democratic primary race to take the seat in the House of Elugardo, and Christopher J. Worrell, who has held various positions in local government, prevailed in a three-way Democratic primary contest to succeed Miranda, according to the AP .

Only a small fraction of the state’s 200 legislative seats had competitive races Tuesday, a testament to the power of the presidency and the lopsided strength of the Massachusetts Democratic Party. Only four contested elections have taken place for Republican candidates.

Statewide, the primary election was also an early test of newly redesigned voting maps that increased the number of majority-minority districts in the state Senate and House of Representatives — the changes put in place after the latest census showed that black, Hispanic, and Asian residents were driving the state’s population growth.

The number of majority minority senatorial constituencies was increased from three to around half a dozen, including a new constituency covering Lawrence and Methuen, as well as parts of Haverhill.

In Essex’s First Senate District, one of the House’s new majority-minority districts, early unofficial returns have put Lawrence Councilman Pavel Payano well ahead in a three-way Democratic primary race against Councilwoman municipal of Methuen Eunice Zeigler, followed by Doris Rodriguez.

Although Zeigler led early returns for much of the evening, the AP updated its vote total for the race shortly before 1 a.m. and reported that Payano held a substantial lead over its rivals.

Early feedback in another newly redrawn state Senate district that includes Brockton, Avon and parts of Randolph showed Sen. Michael Brady easily fending off a Democratic primary challenge from Katrina Huff-Larmond, a Randolph councilwoman. which was endorsed by U.S. Representative Ayanna Pressleyaccording to Politico.

Jonathan Cohn, policy director for Progressive Massachusetts, said redistricting won’t change the racial makeup of the majority-white Legislature in a single election cycle, but it could. have a beneficial impact on policy-making.

“To some extent it depends on who is elected; I think you’ll see better representation,” Cohn said.

The primary also tested the power of Attorney General Maura Healey, who secured the Democratic gubernatorial nomination after running unopposed.

Healey endorsed a dozen legislative candidates — including Payano, Tommy Vitolo of Brookline and state Rep. William M. Straus of Mattapoisett — many of whom won or were leading their races early Wednesday morning, according to initial feedback.

Vitolo postponed a challenge by former Select Board member Raul Fernandez; according to unofficial results released by Brookline’s clerk on Tuesday night, Vitolo got 4,748 votes, against Fernandez’s 2,819 votes.

“Thanks to @raulspeaks for having a good race. It brought to light many important issues in Brookline and in Massachusetts. I hope to join with him and the rest of Brookline in moving these issues forward,” Vitolo wrote on Twitter.

Straus, who helps lead the Legislative Assembly’s transport committee, withstood a lead challenge from Fairhaven’s Richard Trapilo for Bristol’s 10th ward. Straus won with 3,677 votes, while Trapilo had 1,111, the AP reported.

In Boston, Miranda was one of five black Democrats vying for the second seat in the Suffolk State Senate, representing parts of Dorchester, Jamaica Plain, Mattapan and Roxbury. Currently, the state Senate has only one black member — Lydia Edwards, a former Boston city councilwoman.

Miranda, born in Roxbury, is the daughter of Cape Verdean immigrants. She attended Boston Public Schools and Wellesley College. She said she was pressured into running for office after her brother Michael was killed by gun violence.

In a statement released early Wednesday morning, Miranda said she dedicated her victory to her late father, Alberto Pires, whom she described as her “strength throughout this campaign.

“And [to] my people of 2nd Suffolk, we have dreamed together and we will continue to dream and invest our time, talent and treasure in the change we want to see in our community,” Miranda said.

No Republicans are running in this Senate race, so Miranda will almost certainly take the seat in November.

In the state House of Representatives, the number of majority-minority districts grew from 20 to more than 30 during the redistricting process, including a new district representing parts of Lawrence and Methuen. The Lawrence Eagle-Tribune reported that in that district’s Democratic primary, Lawrence Councilwoman Estela Reyes defeated former Mayor and Lawrence Representative William Lantigua and Methuen Councilman James McCarty.

In the 11th Suffolk House District race, which includes Chelsea and part of Everett, Chelsea Councilman Judith Garcia was in first place in a three-way Democratic primary race early Wednesday, the AP reported.

On Tuesday, Republican candidates were not on primary ballots for 21 state Senate seats and 105 House seats.

But there were a few competitive GOP contests. In Bristol’s Tenth House District, currently occupied by Straus, Jeffrey Gerald Swift of Mattapoisett led Robert S. McConnell of Fairhaven by about 105 Republican votes, with more than 90% of districts saying.

Middlesex District’s first GOP primary election had Townsend’s Andrew James Shepherd ahead of Pepperell’s Lynne E. Archambault, the AP reported.

And in Cape Town, Christopher Robert Lauzon was leading Daralyn Andrea Heywood for the GOP Senate nomination, according to early feedback. Both are from Barnstable.

Political watchers were also watching a Republican house race that could gauge support for the far right. In the North Shore House neighborhood vacated by Republican Rep. James Kelcourse, a right-wing agitator who helped organize buses to Washington, D.C., for the protest that culminated in the Jan. 6 insurrection, is organizing a written campaign .

Kelcourse, who left for a position on the parole board in June, was the only Republican whose name remained on the primary election ballot on Tuesday.

Samson Racioppi, a leader of the right-wing group Super Happy Fun America, and who led the 2019 “Straight Pride Parade” in Boston, is mounting a print campaign, as is a more moderate candidate, CJ Fitzwater.

On Tuesday, Jim Lyons, the chairman of the Republican Party in the state, suggested to WGBH News that the winner of the write-in race would be nominated as the party’s candidateand the executive committee would vote on the matter.

Erin O’Brien, a political science professor at UMass Boston, expressed concern that such a candidate is trying to mount a print campaign.

“If a party is infiltrated by candidates who do not respect the rule of law, it is not an outrageous statement to say that it is a big problem. The under-reaction is the problem,” O’Brien said.

Dan Adams, Samantha Gross, Emma Platoff and Matt Stout of Globe staff contributed to this report.


John Hilliard can be contacted at john.hilliard@globe.com.

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New congressional maps in southern states dilute black votes, critics say https://luxembourgglobe.com/new-congressional-maps-in-southern-states-dilute-black-votes-critics-say/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 22:47:37 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/new-congressional-maps-in-southern-states-dilute-black-votes-critics-say/ BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — When Press Robinson registered to vote in South Carolina in 1963, he was handed a copy of the U.S. Constitution and told to read it aloud and interpret. Robinson, then a sophomore in college, was not surprised. He heard stories of other members of the Southern black community who faced […]]]>

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — When Press Robinson registered to vote in South Carolina in 1963, he was handed a copy of the U.S. Constitution and told to read it aloud and interpret.

Robinson, then a sophomore in college, was not surprised. He heard stories of other members of the Southern black community who faced Jim Crow-era methods of suppressing black votes – from literacy tests to poll taxes to the infamous “test of jelly” which required potential voters to guess how many little candies were in a jar.

As Robinson began to read, he thought of the woman behind him who was also registering to vote for the first time: his 43-year-old mother, who had never fulfilled her constitutional right, partly out of fear that she would meet this exact situation. .

In 1965, the Voting Rights Act banned discriminatory voting practices from many Southern states, where Jim Crow laws also limited how and where black people could live, work, eat, and study.

Yet nearly 60 years later, Robinson and civil rights activists say those gains are eroding. In Alabama, Florida and Louisiana, new congressional cards that some justices say dilute the power of black voters are being used in upcoming elections.

READ MORE: Voting rights groups file lawsuit against Florida congressional map

Civil rights leaders fear the maps could reduce minority representation on Capitol Hill. The issue is particularly contentious this year, when Democrats — traditionally favored by minority voters — are battling to hold onto narrow midterm congressional majorities that tend to reward the party that isn’t in the White House.

“I’m hurt. I’m shocked. I’m disappointed,” Robinson, 85, said. “I’m also a little scared, because I don’t know where this is all going.”

Every 10 years, state legislators, armed with new information from the US Census Bureau, redraw political maps for seats in the US House, State Senate, and State House. It is usually an extraordinarily partisan process, with each major party trying to muster enough of its voters to secure victories in the most constituencies. Borders determine which political parties will make decisions that will have a profound impact on people’s lives, such as abortion, gun control and how billions of tax dollars are spent.

Under the Voting Rights Act, map makers are required to draw districts with a plurality or majority of African Americans or other minority groups if they live in a relatively compact area with a white population that votes very differently from them.

Republican lawmakers have often used this to their advantage by filling a district with Democratic-leaning African-American voters, leaving the remaining seats whiter and more Republican.

Republican-dominated legislatures in Alabama and Louisiana produced such maps after receiving the latest 2020 U.S. Census numbers. In both cases, Democrats and civil rights groups sued in court and the courts ordered that new maps be drawn.

In Alabama, the U.S. Supreme Court suspended the lower court’s decision, essentially saying there wasn’t enough time to redraw the maps before the election and would resume arguments in the fall. The court also delayed a decision that would have allowed for the creation of a second majority black district in Louisiana, until it could hear arguments in the Alabama case. A decision is unlikely to come before 2023.

In Florida, the GOP-led legislature approved — and an appeals court upheld — a map created by Republican Governor and potential 2024 presidential candidate Ron DeSantis that would dismantle at least one district where blacks have their say at the ballot box.

READ MORE: Florida appeals court reinstates Congress DeSantis map that may favor Republicans

“What this ultimately means is that (black voters) won’t have as big a voice as they should if constituencies were drawn more evenly,” said Robert Hogan, professor and director of the department of political science at Louisiana State University.

In Alabama, GOP lawmakers have grouped most black voters into just one of seven congressional districts, even though blacks make up 27% of the state’s population.

In Louisiana, where nearly a third of the state’s population is black, GOP lawmakers approved a map containing five majority-white districts, all of which favor Republican incumbents. The 2nd Congressional District, held by Democratic US Representative Troy Carter, is the only majority black district. It stretches from the New Orleans area along the Mississippi River to the capital, Baton Rouge.

Democrats and black activists want two black-majority districts instead of just one.

“We want our seat at the table,” Louisiana state Rep. Denise Marcelle, a Democratic and black caucus member, said during a recent legislative session. ” It is very simple. …Give us the opportunity to elect another black seat so we can fight for the issues we think our people want us to fight for.

But Republican leaders say placing the state’s widely dispersed black population in two districts would actually result in very narrow black majorities that could diminish the power of black voters.

There’s also another reason why the GOP generally opposes — and Democrats support — other majority black districts. For decades, black voters overwhelmingly voted Democratic. Adding majority black districts could bolster party representation in the House.

“(Republicans) want to use the Voting Rights Act to the extent that it helps put all African Americans in one district and creates very uncompetitive, heavily Republican districts around it,” Hogan said. “But, when you take the Voting Rights Act too far and try to create a second district…you take away the Republicans.”

The way Robinson sees it, however, it’s not about more Democratic seats and fewer Republican seats; these are basic rights that black people have fought too long and hard to let go.

“It’s 2022. I thought once we got past those initial hurdles in the ’60s, things would really move forward and we’d be treated like regular Americans,” Robinson said. “But we are not.”

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3 racially discriminatory maps and an illegal Gerrymander supporter could help the GOP win the house https://luxembourgglobe.com/3-racially-discriminatory-maps-and-an-illegal-gerrymander-supporter-could-help-the-gop-win-the-house/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 09:45:00 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/3-racially-discriminatory-maps-and-an-illegal-gerrymander-supporter-could-help-the-gop-win-the-house/ Earlier this year, federal judges found that maps of congressional districts adopted in Alabama, Georgia and Louisiana did not provide sufficient representation of black populations in their respective states. In July, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that the state’s district map was an illegal partisan gerrymander. Nonetheless, these four maps, all drawn and adopted by […]]]>

Earlier this year, federal judges found that maps of congressional districts adopted in Alabama, Georgia and Louisiana did not provide sufficient representation of black populations in their respective states. In July, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that the state’s district map was an illegal partisan gerrymander.

Nonetheless, these four maps, all drawn and adopted by Republican politicians, will be used for the 2022 midterm elections. These racially discriminatory maps and illegal partisan gerrymanders will likely cost Democrats between five and seven House seats.

That could mean a lot, as polls continue to show a tighter-than-expected race for control of the House in 2023.

As polls tighten and President Joe Biden’s approval rating rises, forecasts for GOP House gains are plummeting. The average expected House majority the GOP is expected to win fell from 21 seats at the end of June to just 11 on September 1, according to FiveThirtyEight. GOP’s projected gains fell from 20-35 mics to 10-20 in Cook Political’s Prospects for the August 30 elections.

If the fight for control of the House draws even closer, the GOP may win control on the back of these four controversial state cards.

Violations of voting rights in the south

In Alabama, Republicans drew a new seven-district map that lumped much of the state’s black population into one Democratic-favoring district and dispersed the rest into six predominantly white districts with a strong Republican lean. Since black Alabamans make up 27% of the state’s total population, a seven-seat congressional district map should provide two majority black seats, per Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act.

Republican National Committee Chair Ronna McDaniel hands the gavel to House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), who could become president if Republicans win control of the House midterm in 2022 .

Chris Carlson-Pool/Getty Images

Civil rights and voting groups challenged the map in federal court where a three-judge district court panel, made up of two Donald Trump appointees and one Bill Clinton appointee, found that the map violated the Voting Rights Act and ordered the state to draw a new map with an additional majority black district. When Alabama asked the court to lift the injunction on the district map as it appealed its decision, the judges rejected it, noting that it was a “simple case of the section two”, supported by “an extremely strong body of evidence”.

Similarly, Republicans in Louisiana passed a new map of congressional districts over Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards’ veto with five majority white districts heavily favoring Republicans and a single majority black district favoring Democrats despite the fact that the Black Louisianans make up 33% of the state’s population. A district court judge ordered that a new map be drawn since the “representation of blacks under the adopted plan is not commensurate with the share of blacks in Louisiana’s population.”

But in both cases, the Supreme Court’s conservative supermajority intervened to overturn the district court’s orders and allow the two states to keep their unrepresentative maps, saying it was too close to an election to change the maps. . The court also said it will hear arguments in its fall session on whether Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act actually requires states to add new opportunity districts for minorities to reflect the growth of the minority population.

A Georgia district court judge also ruled that the state’s Republicans should have included a majority-black Third District because black Georgians make up 33% of the state’s population and have grown in number. 500,000 since the 2010 census. But, following the Alabama Supreme Court ruling, the judge refused to block the map with only two majority black districts from being used in the 2022 election .

“Those are three seats that would have been Democratic seats that won’t be Democratic seats,” said Michael Li, a senior redistricting attorney at the Brennan Center for Justice, a nonprofit that advocates and litigates on voting rights and non-partisan redistricting.

Gerrymandering supporter in Ohio

In northern Ohio, which lost a House seat after the 2020 census, state Republicans led the most controversial redistricting process after refusing to comply with a constitutional amendment passed by the Ohioans in 2018 to prevent partisan gerrymandering.

The voter-approved amendment created a redistricting process designed to encourage bipartisan agreement while prohibiting the passing of maps that unduly favor one party over the other.

The redistricting process gives the state legislature the first chance to draw congressional constituency lines. But they only pass if the map is backed by a two-thirds vote of both legislative houses that includes half of the minority party – in this case, the Democrats. If the legislature fails, a seven-member redistricting commission, made up of five Republicans and two Democrats, gets a turn. If the commission’s card doesn’t receive bipartisan support, the lawmaker gets another chance, but its card will only be valid for four years, instead of the usual 10.

The skyline of Cincinnati, Ohio, is seen November 7, 2021. Republican officials in the area drew a map of Congress running through the city, a maneuver used to dilute the voting power of minority communities.
The skyline of Cincinnati, Ohio, is seen November 7, 2021. Republican officials in the area drew a map of Congress running through the city, a maneuver used to dilute the voting power of minority communities.

Megan Jelinger for The Washington Post via Getty Images

Twice, the Ohio Supreme Court, in 4-3 votes, found that Republican-adopted congressional district maps “disadvantaged the Democratic Party in violation” of the state constitution. But a map went into effect for the state’s primary elections and will remain in effect until the 2024 election.

This map would have given 10 seats to the Republicans and five to the Democrats, but three of the Democratic-leaning seats are highly competitive compared to just one of the GOP-friendly seats.

Predictions of the election results from this map submitted to the court showed that the most likely best-case scenario for Democrats was to win four seats in Congress. That would be just 27% of the state’s congressional delegation despite Democrats winning 47% in recent statewide elections. It’s also a best-case scenario. Democrats could win as few as two seats.

That’s a stark difference from the map the Ohio Supreme Court said the state should adopt. This map would give Republicans nine seats and Democrats six.

By adopting the current map, Democrats risk losing between two and four seats they would otherwise gain if Ohio politicians followed the lead of the state Supreme Court.

Those four states alone cost Democrats between five and seven seats they would otherwise be able to win, depending on the general political climate. It could mean a lot after Election Day if the vote is close.

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