Political maps – Luxembourg Globe http://luxembourgglobe.com/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 22:55:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://luxembourgglobe.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-5.png Political maps – Luxembourg Globe http://luxembourgglobe.com/ 32 32 Court documents set the stage for pleadings on new maps from December 7 | Politics https://luxembourgglobe.com/court-documents-set-the-stage-for-pleadings-on-new-maps-from-december-7-politics/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 22:55:00 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/court-documents-set-the-stage-for-pleadings-on-new-maps-from-december-7-politics/ SPRINGFIELD – Lawyers for Democratic General Assembly leaders have filed documents in federal court denying that the new maps of state legislative districts constituted racial gerrymandering, instead accusing plaintiffs in all three lawsuits of attempting to use race to redesign districts for their own purposes. The documents filed are Democrats’ response to proposed changes in […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD – Lawyers for Democratic General Assembly leaders have filed documents in federal court denying that the new maps of state legislative districts constituted racial gerrymandering, instead accusing plaintiffs in all three lawsuits of attempting to use race to redesign districts for their own purposes.

The documents filed are Democrats’ response to proposed changes in district maps submitted last week by Republican leaders, a Latin American advocacy group in Chicago, and black civil rights groups in the metro area of ballast.

A three-judge panel from the Chicago federal court is scheduled to hear oral arguments in the three separate cases starting Dec. 7.

The new maps will determine how communities across the state will be represented at the Springfield General Assembly for the next 10 years.

Due in large part to the pandemic, the US Census Bureau did not release detailed official 2020 census figures until mid-August. Lawmakers then called a special session to adjust the initial maps they approved in the spring – maps based on population estimates from survey data – and adopted a new set of maps on August 31. 24.

Among other things, census figures showed that Illinois had lost population overall since the 2010 count. But there had been a substantial increase in the state’s Latino population, while its populations black and white were both diminishing.

In separate lawsuits, Republican leaders and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund have both argued that despite the growing Latin American population, the new maps actually reduce the number of districts in which Latinos constitute a majority. , or a large plurality, of the population of voting age. They argued that this violated both the U.S. Constitution and the Federal Voting Rights Act of 1965.

In another lawsuit, the East St. Louis branch of the NAACP, as well as the state chapter of the NAACP and the United Congress of Community and Religious Organizations, argued that in the eastern metropolitan area, the Concentrated areas of black voters were divided into three House-only districts. in an effort to protect the incumbent White Democrats.

The three lawsuits name Senate Speaker Don Harmon of Oak Park, Speaker of the House Emanuel “Chris” Welch of Hillside, and the Illinois State Council of Elections as accused.

In their court case this week, however, lawyers for the Democratic leadership denied any constitutional or legal violation.

“The September redistribution plan (…) protects the voting power of minorities and offers Hispanic and black voters more than equality of opportunity to elect the candidates of their choice,” their brief said. “The three plaintiffs have not provided evidence to support the contrary and have failed to demonstrate that the September redistribution plan violates voting rights law or the US Constitution.”

Earlier this month, all three groups of plaintiffs submitted their proposed map revisions. The Mexican-American group proposed changes to the Chicago area that would create 10 predominantly Latino districts in the Chicago area, while Republicans proposed to create an 11th Latin district in Aurora.

Both NAACP plaintiffs and Republicans have proposed redesigning the eastern metropolitan area to create a largely Black House neighborhood in East St. Louis.

In this week’s response, Democratic leaders argue that none of these proposals overlap and that each would have ripple effects that would affect neighboring districts that were not challenged.

“In other words, the plaintiffs have proposed three competing recovery plans, without any proposal to reconcile the differences,” the Democrats’ lawyers wrote.

In northwest Chicago, Democrats argue, the plan proposed by MALDEF would create a Latino senatorial district and three Latin American districts by reconfiguring districts that are already majority Latin American while reducing the influence of Latinos in another Senate district that has elected a Latino since 2003.

They argue that the proposed changes were entirely based on race and that the complainants “do not even attempt to articulate another reason for their proposed changes.”

The Republican proposal, Democrats say, “seeks to repair a racial gerrymander on the Northwest side by itself by racially gerrymanding Latinos in and out of districts and politically gerrymandering them throughout the region.”

Further, they argue, the GOP plan “moves people in and out of neighboring districts for the benefit of the outgoing Republican of (House District) 20 (Rep. Bradley Stephens) and gives Republicans a better opportunity to earn HD 48 and HD 56.

In southwest Chicago, Democrats say, lawmakers have attempted to balance a number of competing demands from different communities, including a request to establish an Asian-American-influenced neighborhood in the area known as the name of Chinatown as well as a Latin neighborhood in the nearby area known as Little Village. .

“The General Assembly, comprising the different political factions in this area, has endeavored to carefully balance the interests of progressive and moderate factions in separate districts of the Senate and the House in order to reduce internal political struggles between the groups. Latinos, ”the Democrats’ lawyers wrote.

In the eastern metropolitan region, Democrats said they “do not dispute that partisanship has played a central role in attracting these districts.”

“As the region has become more politically polarized, Democrats in the General Assembly have prioritized the protection of elected Democratic members in Republican southern Illinois, including the preservation of two districts that elected Democrats black people for over 40 years, ”they wrote.

Capitol News Illinois is a non-profit, non-partisan news service covering state government and distributed to over 400 newspapers statewide. It is funded primarily by the Illinois Press Foundation and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation.


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New maps spark debate over majority-minority districts | New policies https://luxembourgglobe.com/new-maps-spark-debate-over-majority-minority-districts-new-policies/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 15:04:00 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/new-maps-spark-debate-over-majority-minority-districts-new-policies/ By DAVID EGGERT and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, Associated Press DETROIT (AP) – Adam Hollier is an Army Reserve lieutenant, paratrooper, originally from Detroit, Democrat, and black man. He is also a state senator who represents a predominantly black district that stretches across the northeast of his economically battered and resilient hometown. This critical mass of black […]]]>

By DAVID EGGERT and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, Associated Press

DETROIT (AP) – Adam Hollier is an Army Reserve lieutenant, paratrooper, originally from Detroit, Democrat, and black man. He is also a state senator who represents a predominantly black district that stretches across the northeast of his economically battered and resilient hometown. This critical mass of black voters, Hollier argues, ensures him a chance to be elected and to give voice to people who have long been ignored by the political system.

Rebecca Szetela is a self-described lawyer and white woman who chairs Michigan’s new Independent Citizen Redistricting Commission. His job is to redraw the lines of legislative seats to promote more partisan competition in a state where Republicans have dominated the legislature for decades. Szetela and other commissioners argue that one of the best ways to do this and to hold minority voters accountable is to place some of the predominantly black neighborhoods in the Hollier district in other seats, where they might have more to say about Michigan’s leadership.

For Hollier’s 2nd Senate District, this means that some of its Detroit neighborhoods would be grafted onto predominantly white neighborhoods, and its own seat would span Eight Mile Road, the infamous border between Detroit and its first majority suburb. White. Its black voting age population would drop to 42%.

Hollier, like other black lawmakers, is furious, saying the move puts black elected officials at risk. “Overall, black people vote black and white people vote white,” Hollier said. “It’s just reality. It has nothing to do with me. Draw cards that predominantly black communities can win.

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Whether Hollier is right is at the heart of a heated debate over how to ensure that racial and ethnic minority communities can elect whoever they want. The fight is complicated and wobbly – like most surrounding the once-in-a-decade redistribution process. But the stakes are clear: Blacks, Latin Americans and Asian Americans are under-represented in state legislatures.

For decades, the widely accepted strategy was to regroup black voters into a majority in a state house or congressional district. This principle was enshrined in the Federal Voting Rights Act, which requires the establishment of constituencies with a majority or a plurality of black voters – or other minority racial or ethnic group – in places where the white population usually prevents them from electing their chosen one. representatives.

This strategy was reinforced by partisan politics. Republicans have been happy to draw ridings with large numbers of black voters because black voters are overwhelmingly pro-Democrats. The effect was to regroup Democrats in just a few districts and leave other parts of the state more secure for Republicans.

But politics have changed dramatically since the law was passed in 1965. Today, only 18 of the 53 members of the Congressional Black Caucus have been elected from predominantly African-American districts. Rising black politicians like Rep. Antonio Delgado and Rep. Joe Neguse represent the heavily white areas of New York’s Hudson River Valley and Boulder, Colorado, respectively.

“I think we are in a new era now,” said Bakari Sellers, a former African-American lawmaker from the state of South Carolina. “If you’re talented enough, you can win in a 30-35% black district.… We can be more competitive nationwide.

But it’s a tough sell to some lawmakers and advocates pushing to put more people of color into state houses and Congress. Black lawmakers make up less than 10% of state lawmakers in the United States, although 14.2% of the population is black, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Latinos make up 18.7% of the population and only 5.3% of state legislators. Asians represent 2% of legislators but 7.2% of the population.

In Nevada, Latinos and other activist groups have opposed maps drawn by the Democratic-controlled legislature because the plan has spread Latinos widely in congressional and state legislature districts to increase the chances of Democratic victories. In Wisconsin, Democratic Gov. Tony Evers has asked a commission to come up with maps to counter those drawn by the GOP-controlled legislature. But black and Latino Democrats opposed the commission’s cards because they would scatter minority voters across multiple districts.

“I completely understand what the Republicans did, but I’m not ready to sacrifice black representation and brown representation, I just am not,” said Senator Lena Taylor, one of the two Afro Democrats. -American Wisconsin State Senate, which voted against her party’s card.

The other, Senator LaTonya Johnson, disagreed, saying the Democratic plan was much better than the alternative: “I don’t think the proposed cards would block prime black candidates, but I would rather have to fight harder for my seat that my community suffers another 10 years under a Republican gerrymander. “

The risks of balancing the racial makeup of districts were illustrated in this month’s Virginia election. Two black Democratic delegates narrowly lost their seats in still predominantly African-American constituencies – but had recently been redesigned to have fewer black voters. Control of the House of Delegates will boil down to two other races that are in recount.

Jonathan Cervas, one of the experts who redesigned Virginia’s districts in 2019, said the goal was to rectify what a court had ruled to be discrimination against black voters. He argued that the Voting Rights Act does not guarantee that black lawmakers will always be re-elected. “The problem is, the Democrats had a bad election,” Cervas said.

Yet the move towards unpacking districts is likely to result in a turnover of legislatures and Congress. In North Carolina, a new GOP-approved card reduced the share of black voters in Democratic Representative GK Butterfield’s district from 45% to 38%. The nine-term African-American congressman announced his resignation this month and called the new card “racially gerrymandered.”

At the other extreme, Democrats filed a lawsuit this month alleging that Republicans in Alabama improperly crammed black voters into the state’s 7th Congressional District, making it home to nearly one in three African Americans in the state.

A quarter of Alabama’s population is black, but 7th is the only district represented by an African American in Congress, Representative Terri Sewell. It is also the only district owned by Democrats in the state. Democrats say a more even distribution of black voters could help gain a second.

Increasing competition is one of the goals of the Michigan commission, which voters created in 2018 after decades of Republican-controlled partisan gerrymandering. The commission is also responsible for examining the representation of minority communities and for monitoring the law on voting rights.

He is proposing maps that would reduce the number of black-majority districts from two to zero in Congress and from about a dozen to three in the Legislature, pending final votes. Commissioners argue that there is evidence that black candidates can still win elections. In 2020, for example, racial minorities won 19 of 20 legislative seats where blacks make up at least 35% of the voting age population.

“What we have done is take these areas and divide them into several districts so that there are actually more districts where the minority voters can elect their candidates of choice, which should actually have the effect of d ‘Increase representation within the African American community,’ Szetela said.

But Republicans and others, including the state’s director of civil rights, predict legal problems ahead.

Jamie Roe, a GOP consultant who tracks the redistribution process, noted that Michigan has had two predominantly black congressional districts since at least the 1960s – whether drawn by lawmakers or the courts.

“They are terribly open to challenging the voting rights law,” he said.

Riccardi reported from Denver.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Oregon Supreme Court Confirms New State House and Senate Cards https://luxembourgglobe.com/oregon-supreme-court-confirms-new-state-house-and-senate-cards/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 19:08:31 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/oregon-supreme-court-confirms-new-state-house-and-senate-cards/ The Oregon Senate met to vote on new congressional and legislative maps as part of the state’s redistribution process on Monday, September 20. Sam Stites / OPB The Oregon Supreme Court has dismissed claims that the state’s new legislative districts passed by Democrats in September were improperly drawn, ending one facet of an ongoing redistribution […]]]>

The Oregon Senate met to vote on new congressional and legislative maps as part of the state’s redistribution process on Monday, September 20.

Sam Stites / OPB

The Oregon Supreme Court has dismissed claims that the state’s new legislative districts passed by Democrats in September were improperly drawn, ending one facet of an ongoing redistribution struggle in the state.

In a ruling on Monday morning, judges ruled that the challengers had failed to prove that the new boundaries of the state’s 60 House districts and the state’s 30 Senate districts were designed with illegal partisan intent, or violated any other rule that legislators are supposed to take into account.

“This court has long recognized that (…) constitutional and statutory provisions confer broad discretion on the legislature to design a redistribution plan,” wrote Justice Chris Garrett, a former lawmaker who played a role in the redistribution in 2011, in the opinion. The court would only go against those plans, he wrote, if it found that lawmakers had failed to consider the appropriate criteria when drawing up the maps, or had “done a choice or choices that were unreasonable. [reapportioning body] already done.

Two lawsuits challenging the cards have failed on these counts, Garrett wrote. The result ends the debate over what Oregon’s legislative districts will look like over the next decade, giving lawmakers and future lawmakers certainty as they consider running for election next year.

The new legislative maps come into effect on January 1. An analysis of the plans using Dave’s Redistricting website suggests they will lead to continued democratic scrutiny of both chambers for the foreseeable future, although it is not clear that the party will maintain three-fifths of the qualified majorities. currently holds.

The two lawsuits challenging the maps offered significantly different arguments to justify their modification.

A lawsuit, filed by two men from Lane County and backed by a representative of the Democratic state, sought only to move a single line of demarcation that separated a section of southeast Eugene from the rest of the town.

Petitioners Gordon Culbertson and David Calderwood argued that carving up a piece of town into a largely rural district unduly separated communities with a common interest. And they said the line was drawn with illegal political intent, to ensure that State Representative Marty Wilde, D-Eugene, was not able to issue a primary challenge to a senator in exercise, Democrat Eugene Floyd Prozanski. As a result, according to the lawsuit, Wilde now lives in a Republican-leaning neighborhood that will be difficult for him to gain access to.

State attorneys, meanwhile, said the contested limit became necessary after lawmakers made changes to their original proposed map to ensure the University of Oregon was not split into different districts. This change, they noted, came at the behest of Wilde and others who wanted the university to remain entirely in one district.

Garrett and other justices found no reason to find the line lawmakers arrived at was better than the proposed change in the court challenge, and they seemed to doubt that Wilde had been the victim of political retaliation, like he and other lawmakers have said so.

The other challenge for the cards was much broader. Filed by a former Republican state lawmaker and Lake Oswego lawyer, the lawsuit suggested lawmakers failed to conduct the proper process when considering new districts and passed an illegally partisan map that should be completely deleted.

The judges were not impressed by these arguments, saying they were “unconvincing, in large part because they are based on questionable assumptions and not based on the reasons behind the actions of the Legislative Assembly “.

Since it ruled that the card challengers failed to prove the fundamental points of their case, the state Supreme Court did not pursue certain claims raised by the Oregon Department of Justice that did frowning in recent weeks.

Perhaps most notably, the DOJ has repeatedly argued in court that even if lawmakers passed plans illegally gerrymandered under state law, the court would be powerless to stop it. This argument rests on the idea that the bill adopting new political districts, Senate Bill 882, would prevail over the old law which prohibited partisan gerrymandering.

“A law cannot be struck down on the grounds that it violates another law rather than a constitutional provision,” the DOJ wrote in a court filing earlier this month. “If SB 882 was in conflict with ORS 188.010, the former would control as the most recently passed law. “

The argument sparked disbelief in some corners when it was revealed, but the judges were not ultimately ruling on its merit on Monday.

Though widely adopted on party lines, the state House and Senate districts that will now come into effect were the least controversial aspect of a deeply acrimonious redistribution process in September. Lawmakers have fought fiercely over how the state will add a sixth district to the United States House – a move that could impact the party that controls Congress in 2023.

The Congress map adopted by Democrats has been reported to be flawed by several leading tools for measuring the fairness of political constituencies. An ongoing Republican challenge to Congress is before a panel of five judges. During oral argument, the judges hinted they were skeptical that the new districts were clearly gerrymandered, dotting the challengers’ lawyers with questions.

This panel is expected to rule this week. If he dismisses the case, applicants have the option of appealing to the state Supreme Court.


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Governor John Bel Edwards will veto congressional cards that are not “fair.” What does it mean? | New https://luxembourgglobe.com/governor-john-bel-edwards-will-veto-congressional-cards-that-are-not-fair-what-does-it-mean-new/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 00:26:00 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/governor-john-bel-edwards-will-veto-congressional-cards-that-are-not-fair-what-does-it-mean-new/ With Governor John Bel Edwards in the governor’s mansion, Louisiana Democrats will have a seat at the table when lawmakers return to Baton Rouge in February to begin the decade-long process of redrawing the state’s political maps. So far, Edwards has been quiet about how he will exercise his power against a Republican-dominated legislature. He […]]]>

With Governor John Bel Edwards in the governor’s mansion, Louisiana Democrats will have a seat at the table when lawmakers return to Baton Rouge in February to begin the decade-long process of redrawing the state’s political maps.

So far, Edwards has been quiet about how he will exercise his power against a Republican-dominated legislature. He has said on several occasions that he wants to see “fair cards” and, in his monthly radio show Wednesday, went further: “I will veto bills which I believe suffer from flaws. basic equity terms. “

Democrats are hoping that when the dust settles Edwards will demand a congressional card that includes a second district where a majority of voters are black. But the only Democratic governor in the Deep South questioned whether this was a deal breaker to win his signature.

In an interview Thursday, Edwards said it would be both “appropriate” and “ideal” for two of Louisiana’s six congressional districts to be majority minority, given the 2020 census results, which showed that ‘About 33% of Louisiana’s population identify as Black.

“But you have to be able to put them in a district with a map that looks somewhat regular, because obviously you have this population scattered throughout (the state),” Edwards said.

The Democratic governor added that a fair card would avoid the practice of “packing and cracking,” political jargon to concentrate like-minded constituencies in a small number of districts in order to dilute their voting power. It’s the route lawmakers took a decade ago, when they brought together black voters from Baton Rouge to New Orleans to create the 2nd Congressional District, now represented by U.S. Representative Troy Carter, D -Alger.

Louisiana Black Legislative Caucus Chairman State Representative Ted James said lawmakers have a “simple obligation to keep up with the numbers,” and with one-third of Louisiana’s population identifying themselves as black, the math is simple: “one-third of six is ​​two.”

James, a Democrat from Baton Rouge, said it made no sense to bundle Capitol City with the Big Easy. “I ask that Southern University in Baton Rouge is not in the same district as Southern University in New Orleans,” James said at a town hall meeting Tuesday before lawmakers who will lead efforts to draw the news. cards.

Melissa Flournoy, former state lawmaker and head of Louisiana Progress Action, said “fair cards” should prioritize racial proportionality and competitiveness. She said the current delegation to Louisiana’s congressional districts will include “five hard-core Republicans” and “one African-American congressman, who for all intents and purposes should represent the voices of African-Americans” across the board. ‘State.

For black residents, Carter is the only “congressman who will return the calls,” Flournoy accused.

At Tuesday night’s redistribution roadshow, Jacquelyn Germany, from Black Baton Rouge, told state lawmakers she was “sick and tired of not being fairly represented in Congress.” Germany is a resident of the Eden Park district, a community on the dividing line between the 2nd and 6th congressional districts. This has left her community “neglected,” she said.

Twice a day, we’ll send you the headlines of the day. Register today.

Gary Chambers, an activist from Baton Rouge who campaigned for the 2nd Congressional District earlier this year, said: “If you live in Baton Rouge and you are black you have to negotiate with people who grew up in the city. New Orleans and New Orleans wants this. seat.”

A coalition of major civil rights organizations, led by the NAACP Legal Defense & Education Fund, sent a letter to state lawmakers in October with seven different ideas on how Louisiana could redraw its maps to include a second district where blacks constitute the majority of voters. They targeted the Monroe-based 5th Congressional District, represented by Congresswoman Julia Letlow, R-Start, in their proposals.

“The state has had only four black members of Congress since Reconstruction,” the letter said. “This is a direct consequence of the configuration of Louisiana’s congressional districts: Black voters are crammed into District 2, the state’s only majority minority opportunity district, and black communities are scattered among the five predominantly white districts in the state (Districts 1, 3, 4, 5, 6). “

The predominantly white constituencies of Congress have never elected a black candidate. Since 1965, when the Voting Rights Act was passed, voters in Louisiana have sent 45 white representatives to Congress.

Louisiana is one of twelve states in the country where the legislature and governor are controlled by opposing political parties. This further sheds light on Edwards and his veto power.

Earlier this year, the Southern Coalition for Social Justice in Durham, North Carolina, asked Edwards to make public the criteria that would trigger his veto, but he asked to postpone the discussion until after the regular session.

On Thursday, Edwards again said it was too early for him to think about vetoing the cards.

“I don’t often talk about veto threats (when) we haven’t even started the session,” Edwards said. “I look forward to working with the Legislature with the goal of drawing fair maps that represent the state and its current configuration. “

Even though the governor has detailed his veto criteria, it is unlikely to influence how Republican lawmakers draw the cards, Flournoy said. She said the best strategy might be to wait and see what the GOP sends him, and hope he is blatant and selfish enough to turn against them.

“My feeling is that the governor doesn’t want to be directly involved, that this is a legislative function and that he will wait and see what they present to him,” she said.


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Election ’22: Redistribution Commission seeks comments on political maps | New https://luxembourgglobe.com/election-22-redistribution-commission-seeks-comments-on-political-maps-new/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 18:05:00 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/election-22-redistribution-commission-seeks-comments-on-political-maps-new/ The maps of the legislative areas of Congress and the State of California change every 10 years and are currently in the process of being redrawn for the November 2022 election. On November 10, the California Citizens Redistricting Commission released its first round of draft maps for the state assembly, state senate, and congressional districts. […]]]>

The maps of the legislative areas of Congress and the State of California change every 10 years and are currently in the process of being redrawn for the November 2022 election.

On November 10, the California Citizens Redistricting Commission released its first round of draft maps for the state assembly, state senate, and congressional districts. These maps are available on the website of the commission. They are likely to be redrawn on the basis of comments submitted by constituents.

This independent organization is seeking public comment on these proposed changes to political border areas until 23 November. She must finalize the cards and submit them to the Secretary of State’s office by December 27.

The maps offered are based on 2020 demographic data collected by the US Census Bureau. Each congressional or state legislative district must have an approximately equal population of residents, and according to the state’s voting rights law, minority groups must have equal opportunities to vote for representatives. Cities, neighborhoods and other “communities of interest” also cannot be divided on the new maps.

The seat of California’s 7th Congressional District is up for election next year, and its current rep, Ami Bera, D-Elk Grove, has noted that it is still early in the redistribution process and that card projects will suffer. probably several changes due to public testimony given to the Commission.

“Regardless of the process, I look forward to continuing to represent the Sacramento County suburbs, including my Elk Grove home, in the United States House of Representatives,” he said.

The Congressional District of Bera currently covers eastern and most of southern Sacramento County. Its boundary extends to Citrus Heights and Folsom in the north, the Rosemont area of ​​Sacramento in the west, the eastern county border in the east, and the town of Galt border in the south.

In the first draft of the 7th Congressional District map, its district would be expanded to cover Galt to the south, downtown Sacramento to the north, Rancho Murieta to the east, and Clarksburg to the west. Bera’s hometown of Elk Grove would remain in her district.

As for the proposed changes to the state’s legislative maps, Elk Grove would also remain in his state assembly and senate districts. The 9th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Jim Cooper of Elk Grove, would extend to Interstate 5 in the west, the Sheldon area of ​​Elk Grove in the east, the southern border from Elk Grove to the south and south to Sacramento to the north.

Senator Richard Pan’s District 6 seat of Senate will be open for election next year as he has reached his term limit. The first map proposed for this district could cover most of Sacramento County. This district could extend north to Antelope, east to Rosemont, west to Sacramento’s Parkway and south to Elk Grove.

Readers can view the proposed maps and submit their comments to the California Citizens Redistricting Commission at www.WeDrawTheLinesCA.org.


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California political map projects would reshape key districts https://luxembourgglobe.com/california-political-map-projects-would-reshape-key-districts/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 23:24:15 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/california-political-map-projects-would-reshape-key-districts/ President Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif., Speaks as Acting Director of Immigration and Customs, Matthew Albence, appears before a Homeland Security Subcommittee oversight hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, July 25, 2019. Draft maps released by the California Citizens Redistricting Commission on Wednesday, November 10, 2021, show that key parts of its district have been redrawn […]]]>

President Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif., Speaks as Acting Director of Immigration and Customs, Matthew Albence, appears before a Homeland Security Subcommittee oversight hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, July 25, 2019. Draft maps released by the California Citizens Redistricting Commission on Wednesday, November 10, 2021, show that key parts of its district have been redrawn into a district that includes Long Beach, an area now represented by Democratic Representative Alan Lowenthal. AP Photo / File photo of Andrew Harnik

Kathleen Ronayne The Associated Press Political maps recently released by the California Redistribution Commission would leave some members of Congress without a political home and others face off against colleagues from their own party in the 2022 midterm election when the state will play a key role in determining which party controls Congress. The maps released late Wednesday November 10 are drafts that could change significantly before being finalized in December. They offer a first glimpse of how California’s loss of a Congressional seat from 53 to 52 will reshape its political landscape. California lost a seat because it grew more slowly than other states over the past decade, but remains by far the largest delegation in the House; each congressional district must represent


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The Associated Press (AP) is an American nonprofit news agency headquartered in New York City. Founded in 1846, it operates as a cooperative association without legal personality. Its members are American newspapers and broadcasters.


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Voters and civil rights groups challenge Alabama’s political maps – JURIST – News https://luxembourgglobe.com/voters-and-civil-rights-groups-challenge-alabamas-political-maps-jurist-news/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:12:55 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/voters-and-civil-rights-groups-challenge-alabamas-political-maps-jurist-news/ Voters, civil rights and faith groups gathered to file two lawsuits Monday against Alabama’s new state legislature and congressional district maps. Civil rights groups involved include the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Defense Fund (NAACP LDF), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Alabama, and the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). […]]]>

Voters, civil rights and faith groups gathered to file two lawsuits Monday against Alabama’s new state legislature and congressional district maps.

Civil rights groups involved include the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Defense Fund (NAACP LDF), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Alabama, and the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). The first trial focuses on the congressional districts included in HB 1. The second trial focuses on the Alabama Senate and Alabama House of Representatives districts in HB 2 and SB 1.

The two lawsuits bring similar charges. They argue that the newly drawn constituencies intentionally use race to dilute the impact of minority votes. According to the lawsuit, Alabama used the traditional gerrymandering tactics of “packing” and “cracking” to achieve the result. “Consolidation” refers to the process of including as many voters as possible from a particular demographic group in one or more districts. “Cracking” refers to the strategic separation of voters to decrease their ability to impact an election. Both strategies can seriously decrease performance.

The lawsuits tell the facts behind the neighborhood design, as well as the history of racial gerrymandering in the state. They both argue that the new quarters violate the 14th Amendment. The lawsuit against HB1 also claims that the districts violate section 2 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which prohibits certain forms of vote dilution. Both lawsuits ask the court to ban the state from using the districts in the next election. In addition, they ask the court to set a deadline for the state to promulgate different and compliant district maps.

While lawmakers remain confident the cards will stand, the lawsuits will test to what extent the courts choose to intervene over allegations of racial gerrymandering.


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Maryland Redistribution Group Releases Congress Map Drafts | Politics and government https://luxembourgglobe.com/maryland-redistribution-group-releases-congress-map-drafts-politics-and-government/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 20:58:00 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/maryland-redistribution-group-releases-congress-map-drafts-politics-and-government/ ANNAPOLIS – The General Assembly redistribution group on Tuesday released four draft congressional maps, but critics say the maps show signs of continued gerrymandering. The Legislative Redistribution Advisory Commission, established earlier this year by the Democratic leadership of the Legislative Assembly, released the maps days after the state’s other Redistributing Commission handed its maps to […]]]>

ANNAPOLIS – The General Assembly redistribution group on Tuesday released four draft congressional maps, but critics say the maps show signs of continued gerrymandering.

The Legislative Redistribution Advisory Commission, established earlier this year by the Democratic leadership of the Legislative Assembly, released the maps days after the state’s other Redistributing Commission handed its maps to the governor.

The Maryland Citizen Redistribution Commission was created by Governor Larry Hogan (right) and presented him with legislative maps of Congress and state last week.

The Citizens’ Commission was made up of three registered Democrats, three registered Republicans and three unaffiliated voters.

The legislative committee included four Democratic members of the Legislative Assembly, two Republican members of the Legislative Assembly and President Karl Aro, who previously headed the Department of Legislative Services.

In a statement on Wednesday, Hogan expressed his dissatisfaction with the legislative committee’s draft maps, while touting the map given to him by the Citizens’ Committee as being fair and not drawn by ” partisan politicians ”.

On Tuesday evening, Senate Speaker Bill Ferguson and House Speaker Adrienne Jones released a joint statement.

“We are delighted that LRAC is now releasing four draft Congress maps, providing the public with several weeks for input and reaction,” wrote Ferguson (D) and Jones (D).

The maps of the two committees are expected to be examined at a special session of the General Assembly starting on December 6.

In a letter posted alongside the map, Aro wrote that the maps “where possible keep Marylanders in their existing districts. Parts of those districts have remained untouched for at least 30 years and reflect a commitment to be honored. voting rights law, to protect existing communities of interest and to use existing natural and political boundaries.

Aro then apparently acknowledged criticisms of the Congressional lines drawn in 2011, which went to the United States Supreme Court, which ruled that partisan gerrymandering is a political issue “beyond the scope of federal courts. “.

“It is our sincere intention to dramatically improve our current map,” Aro wrote.

Those two intentions could be in conflict, according to Beth Hufnagel, who leads the League of Women Voters of Maryland redistribution team.

“I’m having a little trouble with those two goals,” said Hufnagel.

Critics say that improving a gerrymandered card doesn’t mean drafts are perfect.

“The map was previously nationally recognized as one of the most gerrymandered maps in the country, so almost anything that isn’t that bad is better.”

That’s according to Todd Eberly, associate professor of political science and public policy at St. Mary’s College of Maryland.

“That’s what happens when you already have a pretty serious gerrymander, but you know you’re under more scrutiny because more people are paying attention,” Eberly said.

Eberly told Capital News Service he believed the Legislative Committee wanted to make a card that looked “better” or less gerrymandered, while prioritizing protecting Democratic incumbents in Congress and maintaining a partisan advantage.

The Legislative Commission cards vary in their treatment of different areas of the state, with notable potential changes in District 1, where Rep. Andy Harris is the only Republican member of the Maryland congressional delegation.

Eberly said two of the draft maps could change the partisan balance of the East Coast District.

“I think the two maps that take the first district and bring it across the bridge and into Anne Arundel County make the First District a much more competitive district, if not a district that slightly favors a Democrat.” , Eberly said.

Eberly also pointed to Districts 3, 4 and 7, which he said “continue to be pretty serious gerrymanders.”

District 2, according to Eberly, has been “cleaned up a bit” in some of the map drafts.

Cleaning the map may not have gone far enough, according to Helen Brewer, legal analyst at the non-partisan Princeton Gerrymandering Project.

“The shapes of the neighborhoods are significantly less compact” than the maps released by the Citizens’ Commission, Brewer said.

Of course, the shape of congressional districts is not the only way to assess whether gerrymandering has taken place.

Brewer said that “the people of Maryland are of course the experts on their own state” and can assess how the proposed district lines interact with different cities and counties.

Geographic features such as rivers and mountains can lead to districts that look odd on paper but keep communities of interest together, Brewer added.

The Legislative Commission has endeavored to give different communities the opportunity to defend themselves in the process of drawing the map by holding meetings statewide.

Hufnagel, along with Women’s League voters, said she couldn’t cite specific examples among the wide range of speakers at the town halls, “they incorporated testimonials into their card choices.”

The presence of choice is both positive and negative for Hufnagel; she thinks it would be good to have more than one option at the moment, while the commission can take public comments into account.

“We hope… they can reduce it to early December,” Hufnagel said.

The differences between the maps of the citizens’ committee and the legislative committee could be summed up in their composition.

Brewer said the Princeton Gerrymandering Project generally prefers to see maps drawn by commissions independent of state legislatures.

“Whenever lawmakers are involved in mapping out… on both sides of the aisle, they will be pressured to stay or keep their party in power,” Brewer said.

The gerrymandering project scores the cards on the basis of partisan equity, competitiveness and geographic characteristics.

They have yet to release any notes for the Legislative Committee maps.

Brewer said the Citizens’ Commission cards performed well on partisan fairness, which she said is consistent with the independent commission cards.

“These cards are not guaranteed to be the ones that will be enacted into law,” Brewer said.

Democrats hold a qualified majority in the Legislature, where Legislative Committee cards are more likely to pass.

More information on the cards is probably on its way.

Common Cause Maryland, a government watchdog group, said in a statement Wednesday that it was working with partner organizations to assess card projects based on their “impact on the voting power of historically marginalized communities in Maryland, as well. than on partisan fairness and traditional redistribution criteria. “

Federal law indicates how states can take race into account when drawing congressional maps.

Common Cause added that they hope the Legislature will issue updated reopening guidelines for the next special session.

“We urge lawmakers to continue to make the redistribution process open and transparent by ensuring that the session is accessible. “

The special session will include the review of Congress maps.

The states’ legislative and senatorial constituencies are expected to be considered in the 2022 ordinary session.

The citizens’ commission presented draft state-level maps to the governor; the legislative committee published only congressional bills.

The legislative committee plans to hold a virtually statewide redistribution hearing on Monday at 6 p.m.

This commission is also due to meet on the evening of November 18, in the northeast.


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Butterfield pledges to fight North Carolina electoral maps, he says dilute black voting power https://luxembourgglobe.com/butterfield-pledges-to-fight-north-carolina-electoral-maps-he-says-dilute-black-voting-power/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 04:21:49 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/butterfield-pledges-to-fight-north-carolina-electoral-maps-he-says-dilute-black-voting-power/ RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – North Carolina has two black representatives in Congress. That number could drop to one if new redistribution maps approved at the General Assembly last week come to court. After 18 years, Representative GK Butterfield could lose his seat in Congress. He told ABC11 on Monday that he was going to fight. […]]]>
RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – North Carolina has two black representatives in Congress. That number could drop to one if new redistribution maps approved at the General Assembly last week come to court. After 18 years, Representative GK Butterfield could lose his seat in Congress. He told ABC11 on Monday that he was going to fight.

“I plan to run again. I will give everything I have,” he said.

Since North Carolina first sent him to Congress in 2004, Butterfield has never had a close election – typically winning at least 60 percent of the vote in the heavily Democratic 1st Congressional District.

“I have done a lot of research on the district (map) that has been proposed, and it will be a very difficult district, to say the least,” Butterfield said.

New congressional maps approved by the Republican majority in the General Assembly last week could turn Butterfield’s seat into a highly competitive seat. He is the former chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, which often represents predominantly black counties.

He argues that the new electoral lines not only give Republicans an unfair political advantage, they prevent voters of color from electing their favorite candidates.

“This is what we call demotion. The district is demoted from 42%, African American to 38%. This violates the Voting Rights Act,” Butterfield said. “It’s just baffling to me why the Republicans are unwilling to prepare and deliver a fair map. It’s not a fair map. He’s a political gerrymander.”

The power-diluting potential of black votes was the subject of a virtual town hall Monday night featuring prominent Democratic lawyer Marc Elias, who filed a lawsuit last week in North Carolina to block the news decoupage cards – arguing that they ‘are drawn on partisan lines in violation of the state constitution.

“(Our electoral system) is going in the wrong direction,” Elias said in town hall. “If you had to design a system that benefits old white people, that’s literally the electoral system we have in this country.”

But, before Republicans won a majority in the General Assembly in 2010, Democrats led constituency redistribution for decades in North Carolina, employing many of the same gerrymandering tactics they now accuse Republicans of.

“I recognize you that 30 to 40 years ago, the Democrats engaged in the gerrymandering,” admitted Butterfield.

“But, at that time, Republicans were very, very few in North Carolina. But now we have evolved as a state. We know what the law is. We know what the constitution means. . And lawmakers now have a duty … compelled to draw a fair map. ” He says the solution is an independent redistribution commission.

Republicans say Democrats are trying to play it both ways – arguing in the decade-long redistribution struggle that the GOP relied too much on racial data from voters and now complained about not looking at it at all.

The Marc Elias lawsuit and another from the NC NAACP have been filed. Butterfield said he was confident the courts would overturn the cards.

Copyright © 2021 WTVD-TV. All rights reserved.



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Alaska Redistricting Board approves new maps (which aren’t that bad) https://luxembourgglobe.com/alaska-redistricting-board-approves-new-maps-which-arent-that-bad/ Sat, 06 Nov 2021 23:27:10 +0000 https://luxembourgglobe.com/alaska-redistricting-board-approves-new-maps-which-arent-that-bad/ After months of meetings and dozens of hearings held statewide, the Alaska Redistricting Board approved new district boundaries for House’s 40 districts on Friday evening in a process that ranged from sympathetic to downright tense to some. moments over the past few days. The process culminated in a high-stakes vote to determine whether the disposition […]]]>

After months of meetings and dozens of hearings held statewide, the Alaska Redistricting Board approved new district boundaries for House’s 40 districts on Friday evening in a process that ranged from sympathetic to downright tense to some. moments over the past few days.

The process culminated in a high-stakes vote to determine whether the disposition of Anchorage area districts would be set according to a proposal by board member Nicole Borromeo, who was appointed by the former Speaker of the House. Bryce Edgmon, and a proposal cooked up at the last minute by Bethany Marcum, who was appointed by Governor Mike Dunleavy. Ultimately, the board ultimately sided with Borromeo’s plan, presenting a largely fair and balanced approach to the region’s maps.

While the council claimed to be above politics, it was hard to ignore the fact that Marcum’s Anchorage card benefited the Tories by associating Democratic incumbents and apparently trying to downplay the votes from neighborhoods in ‘East Anchorage, which represent some of the most diverse areas in the state. It was the dilution of the East Anchorage / Muldoon area into several districts: Eagle River (22), a district of South Anchorage (10), the military base (21) and a true district of East Anchorage (20 , which would be shared by two Democratic incumbents) – that was the subject of much of today’s testimony. Here is Marcum’s card:

V.3 by Bethany Marcum.

At one point during last minute map revisions, Marcum’s map was even more curvy and twisty. The above effort was an effort to to squeeze until, but he still encountered almost universal opposition during public testimony. (It was particularly telling that far-right Anchorage MP Jamie Allard and a staff member of Senator Lora Reinbold accounted for half of the support for the card.) In comparison, here is the card offered by Borromeo:

V.4 by Nicole Borromée.

Gone are the winding neighborhoods replaced by simple, square boundaries that largely follow existing neighborhood lines and groupings. It’s the proposal that was widely supported by community and neighborhood organizations in East Anchorage, who argued it would give them better representation and a better voice in the legislature.

In a particularly tense exchange, Member Melanie Bahnke (appointed by former Supreme Court Justice Joel Bolger) attempted to convey to Marcum any concerns Borromeo’s plan had in terms of constitutional requirements for it. that the districts be compact, contiguous and socio-economically integrated as a minimum deviation from the population wherever possible. It was a particularly critical exchange, especially with the likelihood that anything the board does will be subject to a legal challenge where just about anything and everything said in these hearings will be scrutinized.

In a remarkable moment, Marcum refused and claimed that it was not for her, as a member of the Alaska Redistribution Council, to criticize the work of the other members. Bahnke insisted, saying it wasn’t as much criticism as trying to compare the plans to the very serious constitutional demands they face.

“I’m sorry,” Marcum said, tears seemingly in his voice, “I’m a Christian and I think it’s not appropriate to criticize our fellow board members. I really don’t like it. made you put me in this position.

Borromeo intervened, “First of all, Christianity has no bearing on what we do here today. She then took issue with Marcum’s claim that East Anchorage’s twinning with Eagle River reflected the military base’s ties to the community more than the plan she had devised, which drew several areas neighboring the base to the base. military district.

The only defensive argument Marcum could muster to defend his plan was that he apparently had better deviations than the plan Borromeo wrote. While his repeated assertion that “one person, one voice” should be the overarching goal, counsel for the council has regularly reminded them that constitutional considerations push issues such as compactness, contiguity and socioeconomic integration into the picture. before the deviation of the population. This is a point that board staff cautioned at the start of the process, noting that while the gap was the most easily measurable measure, it is not the most important and that too much focus on the this gap could create considerable problems of compactness and socio-economic integration.

When Chairman of the Board John Binkley, who was appointed by former Senate Speaker Cathy Giessel, appeared uncomfortable with the row between Marcum and the other members, asking “what good is the fighting” Bahnke countered that the constitution and its requirements were important.

And that’s what seemed most important with the fifth and final member of the decision, Budd Simpson (who was appointed by Governor Dunleavy). When they came to a vote on the Anchorage area maps, Simpson said he found both maps acceptable in terms of the population gap, but gave Marcum a slight advantage. He said both were acceptable in terms of compactness from a legal standpoint, but ultimately gave Borromeo’s card the edge, noting that it was the more important of the two values. He eventually joined Borromeo and Bahnke in approving Borromeo’s maps for the region.

No other area required a vote for the board to decide. The issues with Southeast Alaska had already been largely resolved (no incumbents were recut together), there was a bit of trade in the rural districts that seemed to magically resolve much of it. problems at the last minute and the Mat-Su area had little controversy (well, not from inside the council). The Fairbanks area was another big topic of discussion after Binkley’s decision to cut around 4,000 residents of the largely progressive Goldstream Valley to balance the districts and place them in the rural Interior District. As it pushes this district, currently held by Republican Rep. Mike Cronk, to the left, it has the effect of rotating several remaining districts in the Fairbanks area to the right.

The board ultimately approved the entire state card in a 4-1 vote with Marcum, still salty over the Anchorage area decision, as the only vote against the card.

Find different versions of the final map here.

What it all means

Overall, this is a fairer outcome than most might have expected from the high-stakes process where Republicans controlled the majority of seats. It is a great credit to board members Borromeo and Bahnke for building a solid argument over the constitutional and legal requirements of the process, making the choice of the largely fair map of the Anchorage area irrefutable. And thanks to Budd Simpson for ignoring the political nature of his appointment and just going with what his eyes told him about the compactness of maps.

If we’re talking about political fallout, Democrats in Fairbanks have taken the worst by far – some districts may tip over to solidly Republican numbers (I’m looking in particular at Rep. Grier Hopkins’ district) – while districts in the Anchorage area all generally remain as competitive as before the redistribution. Democrats will have to make decisions about who will be incumbent – it pairs Reps Zack Fields and Harriet Drummond in one district and Reps Chris Tuck and Andy Josephson together in another – but seats left open could be prime spots for new voices to ramp up and gain seats. The newly opened East Anchorage headquarters in particular could be a good place for Anchorage to see its diversity reflected in its delegation. There are potential edging changes that could make the races a lot more different than the first blush, but we really won’t see how that plays out yet.

Anchorage Daily News reporter James Brooks has mapped out the list of titular representatives here.

On the Republican side of things, there are certainly some interesting couples. Far-right Republican representatives David Eastman and Christopher Kurka – who are about as close to the fringes as anyone else – are now found together in a Wasilla district. Even before today, Eastman shouted ‘settled in’ about the couples:Pat Race @ alaskarobotics # akleg Oh my God. November 6, 20212 Retweets52 Love

The other match for Republican incumbents is in Eagle River, where Moderate Rep. Kelly Merrick was matched with Rep. Ken McCarty, leaving an open house district that includes the home of Anchorage Assembly member Jamie Allard. .

Representation in rural Alaska, the Peninsula and the Southeast has not changed from the status quo. While there is some lag in the boundaries overall, all incumbents will remain within the district boundaries.

And after

Board staff are currently working on the official final version of the map, checking for potential drafting errors and that sort of thing. The next big decision point concerns Senate twinnings, which will have a huge impact on the impact on the balance of powers of the Senate after the next elections. The council is due to receive testimony on this very issue when it resumes its work Monday morning at 9 a.m. Information about this audience is here.

Senate twins have far fewer legal requirements than House Districts. When I was covering the lawsuit during the final round of redistribution, the Fairbanks area plaintiffs were successful in forcing the board of directors to consider a specific Senate district in Fairbanks (which ended up seeing the two Democratic incumbents of the region lose to the Republicans, instead of the original proposal where they would have been paired in a half-quarter). The pairings will also have an impact on the number of seats available in the 2022 poll. Districts that are very different from those that came before it could have their terms shortened from four to two years.

And, of course, there are the legal challenges.



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